I am the Queen of "Why Me?"

I am the queen of moaning “why me?” and having a tantrum at God when painful things happen in life. Not all painful things that have happened but quite a few, enough to realize I have a problem with this. I found this article quite helpful to think about and thought I’d pass it on to you for your why me moments. I love all the books and sermons Tim Keller has put out mostly because they are gentle and yet kick my butt they are straight forward and yet amaze my mind at the truth! 

4 Wrong Answers to the Question “Why Me?”
06 Aug 2012 by Tim Keller
This article first appeared in edited form on CNN and is printed below in its entirety.
When I was diagnosed with cancer, the question “Why me?” was a natural one. Later, when I survived but others with the same kind of cancer died, I also had to ask, “Why me?”
Suffering and death seem random, senseless. The recent Aurora shootings—in which some people were spared and others lost—is the latest, vivid example of this, but there are plenty of others every day: from casualties in the Syria uprising to victims of accidents on American roads. Tsunamis, tornadoes, household accidents—the list is long. As a minister, I’ve spent countless hours with suffering people crying: “Why did God let this happen?” In general I hear four answers to this question—but each is wrong, or at least inadequate.
The first answer is, “This makes no sense—I guess this proves there is no God.” But the problem of senseless suffering does not go away if you abandon belief in God. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in his Letter from Birmingham Jail, said that if there was no higher divine Law, there would be no way to tell if any particular human law was unjust or not. If there is no God, then why have a sense of outrage and horror when suffering and tragedy occur? The strong eat the weak—that’s life—so why not? When Friedrich Nietzsche heard that a natural disaster had destroyed Java in 1883, he wrote a friend: “Two hundred thousand wiped out at a stroke—how magnificent!” Nietzsche was relentless in his logic. Because if there is no God, all value judgments are arbitrary.  Read the rest here 
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